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9 July 2020

Liquor & Gaming LiveData

Liquor & Gaming LiveData is an online tool that allows you to search the latest liquor licence information alongside demographic, alcohol-related crime and health data for every suburb and Local Government Area in NSW.

To help you get the most out of the tool, we’ve compiled a list of some of the most commonly asked questions about LiveData below.

If you still can’t find an answer to your question after reading the FAQs, please contact us at livedata@liquorandgaming.nsw.gov.au or call 1300 024 720.

What is Liquor & Gaming LiveData?
LiveData is an online tool that allows you to search and generate a report which includes the number and type of liquor businesses and the latest demographic and alcohol-related crime and health data for every suburb and Local Government Area (LGA) in NSW.

It brings together publicly-available data into one centralised, easy-to-use online tool that features interactive maps, charts and benchmarks. This is the same data the NSW Independent Liquor & Gaming Authority (ILGA) considers when it makes decisions on liquor-related applications.

LiveData is informed by ILGA Guideline 6, which describes data that ILGA can consider when assessing the social impacts of a liquor-related application.

What is the purpose of Liquor & Gaming LiveData?
The purpose of Liquor & Gaming LiveData is to improve the transparency and availability of the data used by the Independent Liquor & Gaming Authority to inform its decisions on liquor-related applications.

What are the benefits of Liquor & Gaming LiveData?
Liquor & Gaming LiveData makes it easier for government, industry and the community to access the latest data related to liquor-related applications and alcohol-related risks for locations across NSW.

LiveData will improve the transparency of the liquor licensing process, help applicants and Liquor Accords to better address the risk of alcohol-related harm in their local area, and help the community to prepare better informed submissions in response to liquor-related applications.

What information, other than Liquor & Gaming LiveData, will the Independent Liquor & Gaming Authority consider when making liquor licensing decisions?
Once LiveData has launched, ILGA will continue to consider other information when making liquor-related decisions, including Community Impact Statements, submissions, the information provided by the applicant, and L&GNSW compliance reports.

Why is it called Liquor & Gaming LiveData if it only contains liquor-related data?
While Liquor & Gaming LiveData currently only contains data related to liquor applications, inclusion of gaming-related data is planned for the future.

How do I access Liquor & Gaming LiveData?
You can access the Liquor & Gaming LiveData tool. You can use the tool to create LiveData reports for all suburbs and LGAs in NSW.

How can I use the information in Liquor & Gaming LiveData?
If you are a liquor licence applicant, LiveData can help you identify potential risks of alcohol-related harm in a community.

You can use this information to modify or improve your application in response to those risks.

If you are part of a Liquor Accord, LiveData can help you to understand the alcohol-related trends and risks in your local area. You can use this data to inform accord strategies that address any identified issues.

As a member of the community, LiveData can improve your understanding of conditions and risks in your neighbourhood. This information can be helpful if you wish to make a submission about a liquor-related application.

How can I provide feedback on Liquor & Gaming LiveData?
The best way to provide feedback on Liquor & Gaming LiveData is through the feedback widget that can be found on the right-hand side of the browser.

How do I select certain licence types to show on the map?
Click on the “Data layers” button at the top of the map. A row of different licence types will appear at the top of the panel. You can then toggle the specific licence types that you want to see displayed.

How do I see the distribution of different offences on the map?
Click on the “Data layers” button at the top of the map. Offences can be displayed in either ‘heat map’ or ‘hot spot’ form. Heat maps display the distribution of offences by LGA. They work best by zooming out so the entire LGA can be seen. Hot spots will display the distribution of offences by density. They can be viewed by zooming in close to observe hotspots in specific areas within a suburb, or by zooming out to view hotspots within an entire LGA.

Why does the Street View image of a licensed premises show an outdated or unrelated image?
Street View images on LiveData use Google Street View. This data is not controlled by Liquor & Gaming NSW. There may be occasions where the images are inaccurate due to issues with Google Street View’s technology or the currency of its data.

Why does the map only display one licensed premises in some shopping centres when there are multiple licensed premises in that centre?
Licensed premises that are plotted on the LiveData map use geocodes to determine their location. These geocodes use the address of the premises, which will often plot multiple licensed premises atop each other in instances where they share the same street address.

If you are trying to determine the number of licensed premises in a given suburb or LGA, it is recommended you refer to Appendix D, the ‘Licensed Premises List’.

Where does L&GNSW source the data used in Liquor & Gaming LiveData?
Population, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, and SEIFA data are based on 2016 Census data and sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics website. Liquor licensing data is sourced from the NSW Government’s OneGov database. Offence data is sourced from the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research. Alcohol-attributable hospitalisations and deaths data is sourced from the NSW HealthStats website.

How often is the data used in Liquor & Gaming LiveData updated?
Population and other demographic data are sourced from the 2016 Census. These data is updated every five years when Census data is released. The next Census will occur in 2021. Licensing data is updated monthly. Offence data is updated quarterly. Alcohol-attributable hospitalisations and death data is updated annually. LiveData data is updated as new data becomes available.

Is all data reported on Liquor & Gaming LiveData available in the public domain?
Demographic data from the 2016 Census is publicly available from the Australian Bureau of Statistics website. Alcohol-attributable hospitalisations and deaths data is publicly available on the NSW HealthStats website.

While most offence data is publicly available via the NSW Crime Tool on the BOCSAR website, not all breakdowns by severity of assault and time of day are available via this tool. While not published on the L&GNSW website, liquor licence data can be requested from L&GNSW. Fees for L&GNSW data reports range from $50 - $100 per report.

Why are there suburbs and LGAs that are missing historical census data?
Some suburbs may be missing data from the 2006 and 2011 censuses as they may not have existed at the time of those censuses. Additionally, some LGAs may be missing historic data due to the council amalgamations that have occurred in recent years.

Why is alcohol-attributable deaths data not as recent as alcohol-attributable hospitalisations data?
The time lag for reporting alcohol-attributable deaths is greater than for alcohol-attributable hospitalisations as there are more steps involved in the reporting of deaths than hospitalisations. Further detail can be found under ‘Methods’ in the alcohol-attributable deaths section of the NSW HealthStats website.

Why are alcohol-attributable deaths reported on a calendar year basis and alcohol-attributable hospitalisations on a financial year basis?

NSW HealthStats reports alcohol-attributable hospitalisations on a financial year basis and alcohol-attributable deaths on a calendar year basis. The data included in LiveData reflects this.

How is outlet saturation calculated?
Outlet saturation is a measure of the number of liquor licences compared to the population. It is calculated per 100,000 residents in an area [i.e. (number of liquor licences/residential population) x 100,000]. Packaged liquor licences where a ‘no walk-up sales’ condition exists (i.e. where take-away liquor can only be sold via telephone, mail, or online orders and delivered to a specified location), producer/wholesaler licences without a drink on-premises authorisation, and limited licences are excluded from these calculations.

How is outlet clustering calculated?
Outlet clustering is calculated using the following steps:

Step 1: Draw a 1km radius around each authorised liquor licence in the locality under examination

Step 2: Count the number of other licences (of either the same type or all types, depending on the clustering measure being calculated) within each 1 km radius, including any liquor licences that fall within adjacent suburbs or LGAs

Step 3: Add the number of liquor licences within each 1km radius together and divide by the total number of liquor licences in the area.

How does Liquor & Gaming LiveData measure socioeconomic status?
Socioeconomic status is measured by the ABS Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA) Index of Relative Socioeconomic Advantage & Disadvantage.

What benchmarks are used to compare alcohol-related conditions in an area?
In Liquor & Gaming LiveData, alcohol-related conditions in any area are compared to both NSW and a regional benchmark based on the relevant Australian Statistical Geography Standard remoteness area.

What are the different remoteness areas and what do they reflect?
The five different remoteness areas under the Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS) are:

  • Major cities of Australia
  • Inner regional Australia
  • Outer regional Australia
  • Remote Australia
  • Very remote Australia

The different remoteness areas reflect relative access to services. More detailed information about remoteness areas can be found on the Australian Bureau of Statistics website.

Do outlet saturation and offence rates take into account the number of non-residents that visit an area?
No. Outlet saturation and offence rates are based on resident populations only. They do not account for the number of non-residents that may visit a suburb or LGA. Caution should be exercised when interpreting data for areas which attract a significant number of tourists or visitors.

Why is historical licensing, offence, and health data reported over a three-year period?
ILGA uses data for the most recent three-year period to inform its decisions. Licensing data is confined to a three-year period to avoid misleading comparisons arising from the impacts of the introduction of annual liquor licence fees in July 2015. This scheme resulted in a relinquishment of a significant number of dormant liquor licences at the time. The possibility of extending this three year period in the future will be considered as part of the evaluation of Liquor & Gaming LiveData.

Which liquor licence types are included in licence number calculations?
The following types of liquor licence are included in licence number calculations:

  • Hotel
  • Club
  • Packaged (except where take-away liquor can only be sold via telephone, mail, or online orders and delivered to a specified location – i.e. a ‘no walk-up sales’ condition exists)
  • On-premises
  • Small bar
  • Producer/wholesaler (with drink on premises authorisation)

The following types of liquor licence are not included in licence number calculations:

  • Packaged (where a ‘no walk-up sales’ condition exists - i.e. where take-away liquor can only be sold via telephone, mail, or online orders and delivered to a specified location)
  • Producer/wholesaler (without drink on premises authorisation)
  • Limited

These licence types have not been included because they do not have a continuous presence in a specific location or location-specific impacts.

Are liquor licences that are interstate but still within 1km of an authorised licence factored into outlet density (clustering) calculations?
No. Interstate liquor licences are not factored into outlet density (clustering) calculations.

Do licence numbers reported in Liquor & Gaming LiveData only include venues that are currently trading?
No. Licence numbers provided in Liquor & Gaming LiveData reflect all authorised liquor licences. It is likely that a small percentage of these licences will not be actively trading at any given point in time, though their authorisation allows them to resume trading according to the existing licensing conditions. Licence numbers provided in Liquor & Gaming LiveData do not include surrendered or cancelled licences.

What is the rationale for including each data set in Liquor & Gaming LiveData?
The data sets included in LiveData are informed by ILGA Guideline 61, which describes the data that ILGA can consider when assessing the social impacts of a liquor related proposal under s.48 of the Liquor Act 2007.

Will additional sources of data be added in the future?
Additional sources of data may be included in the future based on research evidence and the outcomes of an evaluation of Liquor & Gaming LiveData.

Why is there no gaming data in LiveData?
While the gaming data was not included in the initial development of Liquor & Gaming LiveData, it may be included in the future.